MFI Opposes MA Bill That Reduces Children to Commodities

Last week, we filed joint testimony with Them Before Us to oppose H.1713, a bill that would undermine families and harm children in Massachusetts. Led by Katy Faust, the keynote speaker at our annual banquet last year, Them Before Usis an organization committed to defending children’s rights. We are proud to partner with Katie and her team to oppose this bill.

H.1713, titled “An Act to Ensure Legal Parentage Equality,” would enshrine “intent-based parenting” in Massachusetts law, making it much easier for parents with no biological connection to a child to acquire that child through surrogacy or sperm or egg donation. While many Christians are slowly waking up to the harms of surrogacy and donor conception, we need to recognize that these methods can have devastating consequences for children who are intentionally separated from their mother, father, or both. In the vast majority of cases, surrogacy and donor conception treat children as commodities to be bought and sold, rather than as human beings with infinite worth.

You can read our testimony here to learn more about why we oppose this bill. We encourage you to contact your state senator and representative and urge them to vote no on H.1713.

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