MFI protests Planned Parenthood

MFI staff joined 400 others last Saturday in Boston to protest Planned Parenthood and its barbaric trafficking of human baby parts. With eight videos already released by the Center for MFI PP protest - 08.22.15Medical Progress, the outrage over the abortion giant’s actions is continuing to grow. The Washington Times reported this week that a California social media analysis firm found conversations about Planned Parenthood have “exploded on social media” and general public opinion of Planned Parenthood has turned “decisively negative.”

The Boston protest was one of four in Massachusetts (locations included Worcester, Springfield and Fitchburg), along with about 320 other protests nationwide. CitizenLink, Focus on the Family’s public policy branch, featured MFI’s video and photos in their coverage of the national protest – the largest protest of Planned Parenthood in history.  These pro-life gatherings were peaceful and prayerful, representing the spreading sorrow over this American holocaust. In Boston, the crowd sang hymns including “Jesus Loves the Little Children” and “Amazing Grace” outside of the Planned Parenthood located strategically within Boston University’s campus.

We encourage you to visit our Facebook page to see pictures from Saturday’s protest in Boston.

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