Is the cannibal murder another fallout of porn?

Although Montreal gay porn actor Luka Magnotta shocked the world last month by allegedly killing and cannibalizing his ex-lover, his behavior is not isolated and may echo a pattern of an out-of-control sexual deviancy fueled by the Internet, according to one expert.
Dr. Judith Reisman, an internationally-recognized expert on pornography and sexuality, told LifeSiteNews.com that she believed Magnotta’s behavior “reflects years of brain imprinting by pornography” and a possible identification with Hannibal Lecter of Silence of the Lambs.
“His homosexual cannibalism links sex arousal with shame, hate and sadism,” said Reisman, who added that although cannibalism is not as common as simple rape, “serial rape, murder, torture of adults and even of children is an inevitable result of our ‘new brains,’ increasingly rewired by our out-of-control sexually exploitive and sadistic mass media and the Internet.”
Vorarephilia, or “vore” for short, is a sexual fetish or “paraphilia” gratified on the Internet largely as a fantasy. But news reports within the past decade show that the Web, hosting countless paraphilic hook-up communities and extreme hardcore pornography, has spurred the realization of gruesome crimes that defy the imagination.
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