Contact Sen. Brown on the Parental Rights Resolution

To date, thirty-seven United States Senators have signed onto Senate Resolution 99, the Senate resolution opposing ratification of the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) because this treaty would violate US sovereignty and take away parental rights. Thirty-seven senators is good news since that number can effectively halt any efforts by the Obama Administration to ratify the treaty which requires a 2/3 senate majority. The goal is to have 40 senators in opposition and unfortunately, Sen. Scott Brown has thus far refused to sign the resolution.

TAKE ACTION: Call Senator Brown today at 202-224-4543 and ask him to sponsor and support SR 99. Tell him that SR 99 is critical to protecting our rights to self-determination and self-government. Tell him that the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) would be binding on American families, courts and policy-makers, and would automatically override almost all American laws on children and families. The treaty’s “best interest of the child principle” would give the government the ability to override every decision made by every parent if a government worker disagreed with the parent’s decision.

For more information on SR 99, CLICK HERE and visit www.parentalrights.org.

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